Credit Valley Hospital

Media Release

March 18, 2009

 

Public Health Agency of Canada
www.publichealth.gc.ca

NEWS RELEASE

Government of Canada gives Canadians tools to help detect diabetes risk

MISSISSAUGA, March 18, 2009 – Bob Dechert, Member of Parliament for Mississauga-Erindale, Ontario, announced today on behalf of Leona Aglukkaq, Minister of Health, that the Government of Canada is supporting a new project that will help citizens in the Mississauga area determine whether they have type 2 diabetes or are at high risk of developing the disease. The initiative will be undertaken at the Credit Valley Hospital in Mississauga.

The new project, which is one of seven such initiatives taking place across Canada, will see participants aged 40 to 74 complete a questionnaire that will asses their risk of developing diabetes. The questionnaire, known as CANRISK, includes questions about family history, body weight, lifestyle and other factors. After completing the questionnaire, a blood test is taken. In addition to informing those who test positive for the disease, health officials will also advise those participants who have sufficiently elevated blood glucose (sugar) levels that they have a “pre-diabetes” condition and are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

“Early detection is key to managing type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes,” said MP Bob Dechert. “The screening and follow up provided through this initiative will help those who have the disease or are at high risk of developing it get the help they need.”

Participants who screen positive for diabetes and pre-diabetes will be referred to appropriate care and education sessions and encouraged to consult a physician for follow up.

"We are delighted to have this project at our hospital. Our work, particularly our diabetes education efforts, will be further enhanced by our ability to detect this serious disease and help our community," said Michelle DiEmanuele, president and CEO, the Credit Valley Hospital.

To date, 2300 adults have been screened in similar projects across Canada. Of these adults, this method has detected approximately 5% new undiagnosed diabetes and 15% new pre-diabetes cases. Current pilot projects have shown that over half of these at risk pre-diabetes cases would not have been identified through normal screening using the conventional fasting blood test.